Delhi Queer Pride Parade

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4th Annual Delhi Queer Pride Parade, November 2011.

Delhi Queer Pride Parade is organised by members of the Delhi Queer Pride Committee every last Sunday of November since 2008.[1][2][3] The queer pride parade is a yearly festival to honour and celebrate lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people (the whole queer community), and their supporters. The parade usually runs from Barakhamba Road to Tolstoy Marg to Jantar Mantar.

Since its inception in 2008, where some hundreds gathered in central Delhi to celebrate the first public Pride parade, the community-funded march has grown to become a strong movement that primarily addressed Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (which has now been repealed).

The Delhi Queer Pride has maintained independent operations and have chosen to rely on community funding and rejecting any kind of corporate sponsorship, with the aim to focus this unique collective on equal rights, privacy and freedom. The organisation also supports dalit rights, disability rights and the feminist movements.[4]

History[edit]

2008[edit]

Delhi's first Queer Pride March took place on 30 June 2008.[3] In the beginning, only a small bunch of men and women arrived and police was also there, but by evening, there were about 500 people singing, dancing, shouting slogans, holding placards, screaming "377, quit India".[5]

The first ever parade was attended by 500 marchers, who carried rainbow coloured flags and "Queer Dilliwalla" banners marched to bhangra beats. The parade began from Barakhamba road in the heart of the city's business district and went on till Jantar Mantar, an 18th century astronomical observatory.[6]

2009[edit]

The second Delhi Queer Pride was held on 28 June 2009.[7] This march was attended by over 2000 people. It took about two months to organise this march as quoted by queer activist and key event organiser Ms Lesley A Esteves.[8]

2010[edit]

The third Delhi Queer Pride was held on 28 November 2010.[9] More than 3500 people came forward to participate at the Third Queer Pride Parade on the streets of Delhi on Sunday afternoon. That’s not all, this time around the parade was also attended by grandparents and family members of the LGBT community, who had come out to support and celebrate the cause that their loved ones stood for.[10] This pride parade was a celebration on the account of the repealing of section 377 on the 2nd of July 2009, on account of the public interest litigations (PIL) files by Naaz Foundation.[11][12]

2011[edit]

The fourth Delhi Queer Pride was held on 27 November 2011.[13] The march ended in Jantar Mantar with a reading of the "Charter of Demands for LGBT Rights" and a two-minute silence for those who died in the recent Nand Nagri fire tragedy.[1]

2012[edit]

The fifth Delhi Queer Pride was held on 25 November 2012, followed by a picnic near India Gate. The theme for this march was Gender Variance and Identity and Expression.[14]

2013[edit]

The sixth Delhi Queer Pride was held on 24 November 2013. Around 700 people marched from Barakhamba Road to Jantar Mantar.[15]

Many articles were published featuring the organiser, Mr. Mohnish Malhotra.

Delhi Queer Pride 2010.jpg

2014[edit]

The seventh Delhi Queer Pride held on 30 November 2014, was the first pride march after the Supreme Court reinstated Section 377 of the Indian Penal code, which criminalises 'unnatural sex'.[16] The community walked to reinforce their identities with this year's theme 'No going back.'[17] Around 700 people danced and walked against Section 377.[18]

2015[edit]

The eighth Delhi Queer Pride was held on 29 November and kickstarted from Tolstoy Marg at 2 PM.[19] The march saw hundreds of LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual)people and allies walk the two-km stretch from Barakhamba road to Jantar Mantar, ending with a range of performances.[20] The statement this year talked about freedom not just from Section 377, but freedom from all social injustices.[21]

2016[edit]

On 27 November 2016, the ninth Delhi queer pride took place on the streets of New Delhi from Barakhamba Road to Tolstoy Marg.[22] This march saw a larger turnout, where about 800-1000 people turned up. Members of the LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual) community as well friends and families came with placards, masks and costumes.[23] This year's march demanded freedom and solidarity for Dalits, Muslims, women, disabled, Kashmiris, people in the North-East, Adivasis, academics, filmmakers and students.[22][24]

2017[edit]

On 12 November 2017, Delhi hosted its tenth queer pride parade at from Barakhamba Road till Jantar Mantar. Hundreds of people gathered together to support the queer community and demand the repeal of Section 377. The demand was to build a proper system of hate crime legislation which conceptualizes all forms of violence against minorities as a punishable offence. They also demanded to repeal Karnataka Police Act 36, Hyderabad Eunuch Act and remove the marital exception from the rape laws which should offer redressal to all victims/survivors of sexual assault irrespective of gender.[25][26]

2018[edit]

Delhi Queer Pride 2018 was held on Nov 25th. The march, like every year, started from Barakhambha Road.[27]

This was a special march as it was the first Pride in Delhi after section 377 was read down by the Supreme Court of India which decriminalised homosexuality. The energy and the enthusiasm was visible in the humungous turnout. More than 5,000 people from all walks of life identifying with their sexual orientations and genders as they marched in central Delhi in 2018. [28][29]

A group of people danced their way under the nearly 15-metre-long pride rainbow flag, accompanied by dholakwalas. Participants in bright, colourful sarees and feathered head accessories posed with onlookers for selfies and videos, as they marched for more than four hours.[30]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The 4th Annual Delhi Queer Pride March In India (PHOTOS)". Huffington Post. 28 November 2011.
  2. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride 2012: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexual and Transgenders at the parade". IBN Live. 26 November 2012.
  3. ^ a b Showkat Shafi (26 November 2012). "India's Gay Pride". Al Jazeera English.
  4. ^ Mukherjee, Paroma (13 November 2017). "10th Delhi Pride Parade: We're here and we're queer". https://www.livemint.com. Retrieved 15 June 2019. External link in |website= (help)
  5. ^ "Delhi has its first gay parade - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  6. ^ Singh, Madhur (29 June 2008). "Gay Pride Delhi-Style". Time. ISSN 0040-781X. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Gay community to celebrate 'Delhi queer pride' in June - Indian Express". archive.indianexpress.com. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  8. ^ General, The Delhi Walla · in (28 June 2009). "Capital Event – Delhi's 2nd Gay Pride Parade". The Delhi Walla. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Gaylaxy Oct-Dec Issue". issuu. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  10. ^ "Queer Pride Parade in Delhi - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  11. ^ Thomas, Maria. "Timeline: The struggle against section 377 began over two decades ago". Quartz India. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  12. ^ "Indian gay pride parade draws thousands". Reuters. 28 November 2010. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  13. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride 2011 - Gaylaxy Magazine". gaylaxymag.com. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  14. ^ "Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai prepare for Gay Pride - Gaylaxy Magazine". gaylaxymag.com. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  15. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride Demands Legal Recognition And LGBT Rights - Gaylaxy Magazine". gaylaxymag.com. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  16. ^ Bhatia, Ritika (1 December 2014). "Love is love: Hundreds march for Delhi Queer Pride 2014". Business Standard India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  17. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride 2014 | The Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  18. ^ Pasricha, Japleen (30 November 2014). "In Photos Delhi Queer Pride 2014: Loud, Proud and Out". Feminism in India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  19. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride Parade 2015 is Here! | LBB". LBB, Delhi. 17 November 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  20. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride makes a statement on 'muzzling' of individual rights". Hindustan Times. 29 November 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  21. ^ Sen, Rahul (30 November 2015). "Delhi Queer Pride 2015: Fight Against ALL Oppressions". Feminism in India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  22. ^ a b "- Delhi Queer Pride Parade 2016 | The Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  23. ^ "Delhi Queer Pride Parade: Hundreds march seeking 'a life without fear'". Firstpost. 27 November 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  24. ^ Writer, Guest (28 November 2016). "In Photos: Delhi Queer Pride 2016 Demands Freedom And Dignity For All". Feminism in India. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  25. ^ Mukherjee, Paroma (13 November 2017). "10th Delhi Pride Parade: We're here and we're queer". livemint.com. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  26. ^ "Photos: A look at 10 years of Delhi queer pride from HT archives". hindustantimes.com. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  27. ^ day; founder, transforms into a writer at night He is also the; magazine, editor of Gaylaxy (29 November 2018). "In Pics: Delhi's Queer Pride Parade 2018". Gaylaxy Magazine. Retrieved 15 June 2019.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  28. ^ "Delhi awash in rainbow colours as Queer Pride Parade celebrates identity, freedom". https://www.hindustantimes.com/. 25 November 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2019. External link in |website= (help)
  29. ^ day; founder, transforms into a writer at night He is also the; magazine, editor of Gaylaxy (29 November 2018). "In Pics: Delhi's Queer Pride Parade 2018". Gaylaxy Magazine. Retrieved 15 June 2019.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  30. ^ "Delhi awash in rainbow colours as Queer Pride Parade celebrates identity, freedom". https://www.hindustantimes.com/. 25 November 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2019. External link in |website= (help)